Kaboom! Blowing up illegal fishing boats helps local fisheries

Blowing up illegal fishing boats helps Indonesian fishers, says a new scientific study. Indonesia, one of the world’s leading producers of tuna, decided several years ago it had had enough of illegal foreign fishing boats entering its waters and taking an average of $4 billion a year in fisheries profits. This strategy, as astonishing as it may be to us in Seychelles, seems to have worked as a deterrent.

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Transshipment of fish at sea raises global concern

First-ever large-scale analysis of fishing vessel interactions exposes the potential extent of unmanaged exchange of goods at sea

The first-ever large-scale analysis of fishing vessel interactions exposes the potential extent of unmanaged exchange of goods at sea, raising global concerns over illegal fishing and human rights abuses. Transshipment at sea, the offloading of catch from a fishing vessel to a refrigerated vessel far from port, can obscure the actual source of the catch, complicating sustainable fisheries management, and may allow illegally caught fish to enter the legitimate seafood market. Transshipment activities often occur in regions of unclear jurisdiction where policymakers or enforcement agencies may be slow to act against a challenge they cannot see. Continue reading “Transshipment of fish at sea raises global concern”